GMO COMPASS - Information on genetically modified organisms
  Dec 18, 2014 | 4:21 pm
Site Search
Searches all of GMO-Compass in an instant
The setting-up of this website was financially supported by the European Union within the European Commissionís Sixth Framework Programme from 1 January 2005 until 28 February 2007.

The European Commission and other EU agencies are not responsible for the content.
See whatís what.
The GMO Food Database
The GMO Food Database.
You want to know for which food products or plants gene technology plays a role?

Then enter here the name of a plant, foodstuff, ingredient or additive:

Database search
All database entries in overview:
Plants
Foodstuffs
Ingredients and additives
Additives according to E numbers
Enzymes


Please note that the GMO Compass Database currently is being expanded and updated. Please check back for new entries.

Newsletter
Sign up to receive regular updates on GM food quality and safety.
To change or cancel your subscription, please enter your email above.
Contact
Comments, suggestions or questions?
Please contact us at info@gmo-compass.org
Change font size
1 2 3

Country Reports

Eight years of practical experience with GMOs in Spain


When the genetically modified maize Bt176 was planted in Spain in 1998, the country was the first EU member state commercially to cultivate a genetically modified plant. Since then, the area planted with Bt maize has grown from 22,317 hectares in 1998 to roughly 60,000 hectares in 2006 and now represents 16 percent of the total maize acreage. Among farmers, there has been no litigation linked to the adventitious presence of GM maize in conventional or biological harvests during eight years of commercial GM maize cultivation in Spain. Farmers, as well as the processing and food supply chains, have been able successfully to produce both GM and non-GM goods.

 

Successful coexistence without a legal framework

This trouble-free coexistence has been achieved despite the fact that no law regulating coexistence exists in Spain. To date, farmers rely on the Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) developed by the Spanish association of seed producers (APROSE). However, for several years the government has been working on a Royal Decree to harmonise coexistence practices in the country.

Based on trials conducted by public and private institutions and executed in areas where farmers grow crops for a variety of commercial uses, the Spanish Good Agricultural Practice guidelines from 2003 provided for the first time recommendations for coexistence. Consistent with the first two drafts of the Decree on coexistence, they were presented by the National Biosurveillance Commission, which consists of stakeholders concerned with food and feed safety. These guidelines were followed in the 2004 and 2005 crop season.

Drafts for a Royal Decree on coexistence

Two additional drafts of the coexistence Decree were prepared by Spanish authorities later in July 2005 and April 2006. These drafts proposed that isolation distances be increased from 50 metres to 220 metres, although no research or discussion in the National Biosurveillance Commission had advocated this requirement. The Spanish Association of Bioindustries (ASEBIO) and representatives of seed producers, farmers and the feed industry have rejected the last draft of the Decree, arguing that in many areas the increased isolation distance would exclude farmers from the option of cultivating GM varieties. To date, it is unknown whether the latest draft eventually will be enacted or whether a further draft will be required for political consensus.

First study on coexistence under real conditions

For the first time under real conditions in Spain, scientists conducted a study on cross-fertilisation between Bt and conventional maize. The data were published and presented in 2006 (Messeguer et al., Plant Biotechnology Journal, Volume 4, page 633 - November 2006). They demonstrated the feasibility of coexistence for maize in two regions of Spain. The main factors that determined cross-pollination were the synchronicity of flowering and the distances between donor and receptor fields. The researchers concluded that a distance between transgenic and conventional fields of approximately 20 metres is sufficient to maintain the adventitious presence of genetically modified organisms below the 0.9 percent threshold in the total yield of the field.


 

Country Reports: GMOs in the EU Member States
  Austria
Links to information and resources on GM foods
Field trials and commercial cultivation
Coexistence
  Finland
Links to information and resources on GM foods
Field trials and commercial cultivation
Coexistence
GM trees - a Finnish expertise
  Germany
Links to information and resources on GM foods
Field trials and commercial cultivation
Coexistence
GM food surveillance: Results
Testing coexistence in practice
  Greece
Links to information and resources on GM foods
Field trials and commercial cultivation
Coexistence
  The Netherlands
Links to information and resources on GM foods
Field trials and commercial cultivation
Coexistence
  Spain
Links to information and resources on GM foods
Field trials and commercial cultivation
Coexistence
  The United Kingdom
Links to information and resources on GM foods
Field trials and commercial cultivation
Coexistence
March 28, 2007 [nach oben springen]

© 2014 by GMO Compass. All rights reserved. | Imprint | website created by webmotive