GMO COMPASS - Information on genetically modified organisms
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Stakeholder input wanted: survey on research needs for assessing GMO impacts 

Shaping the Future of GMO Research

Stakeholder with interests in the risk and/or benefit assessment of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO’s) are invited to take part in an online survey.

The aim of this survey is to identify which research needs should be prioritised, thereby contributing to the commissioning of research on the health, environment and economic impacts of GMOs.

The survey will close on 15th July 2015.

More information and access to the online survey

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Country Reports:
GMOs in the EU Member States


The European Union has passed regulations covering all aspects of genetically modified organisms from research to commercialisation – with the notable exception of coexistence. The EU Members States, however, exercise a certain degree of freedom when interpreting the EU’s regulatory framework. They may accept EU regulations upon certain conditions and stipulations, and each Member State assigns its own national authorities to deal with GMOs.

The EU first authorised the cultivation of GM crops almost ten years ago, but the extent of adoption can vary significantly from country to country. The same heterogeneity holds true for the public acceptance of GMOs: Although the majority of EU citizens have a negative stance on GMOs, some countries are sceptical but open, while others remain fundamentally opposed agricultural biotechnology.
 

Austria

The Austrian public is strongly opposed to genetically modified crops. With small average field sizes, few farmers believe that coexistence between organic farming, conventional agriculture, and GM crops can occur. The Austrian government’s stance on the issue is in line with popular opinion and has banned several GMOs assessed as safe at the European level. There has been no commercial cultivation of GM plants in Austria to date.

Field trials and commercial cultivation

Coexistence

Links: Legislation, authorities, research and more
 

Finland

Compared to much of Europe, the Finish government and public are relatively open to the prospect of growing genetically modified plants. The fact that no GM crops have ever been commercially grown in Finland can likely be attributed to the fact that today’s authorised GMOs in the EU are not suited to Finland’s high-latitude climate.

Field trials and commercial cultivation

Coexistence

GM trees - a Finnish expertise

Links: Legislation, authorities, research and more
 

Germany

The German public is generally opposed to the release of GM plants. While the government seeks to respect popular opinion, many current politicians support biotechnology, as they consider it an import factor for economic growth. GM maize has been commercially cultivated in Germany since 2004, and in 2005 it accounted for 0.1 percent of the country’s total maize production.

Field trials and commercial cultivation

Coexistence

GM food surveillance: Results

Testing coexistence in practice

Links: Legislation, authorities, research and more
 

Greece

Greece is opposed to GM plants. EU-approved crop events are banned, most regions are GM-free, and stakeholders have agreed to avoid GMOs in agriculture and food. Consequently, no GM crops are being grown in Greece, either commercially or in field trials. Nevertheless, the government is working on detailed coexistence regulations.

Field trials and commercial cultivation

Coexistence

Links: Legislation, authorities, research and more
 

The Netherlands

In 2005, stakeholders in the Netherlands came to a consensus on coexistence rules, making the Netherlands the first country in the EU to have legal coexistence guidelines. Commercial GM crop production, however, has not yet taken place. Although the public acceptance in the Netherlands is slightly higher than in most other EU countries, the technology’s opponents are very active.

Field trials and commercial cultivation

Coexistence

Links: Legislation, authorities, research and more
 

Spain

In Spain, GM maize has been commercially grown since 1998. Thus, it is the EU country with the longest practical experience in cultivating GMOs. In 2006, GM maize accounted for 60,000 hectares of farmland. There have also been many field trials, though most were conducted with varieties of wheat and barley. Despite all this, coexistence regulations have not been enacted. In July 2006, however, the Ministry of Agriculture presented a second draft of the Royal law on coexistence.

Field trials and commercial cultivation

Coexistence

Eight years of practical experience with GMOs in Spain

Links: Legislation, authorities, research and more
 

The United Kingdom

The UK government is not fundamentally opposed to cultivating GM crops, but it has opted for a cautious approach. It has therefore restricted commercial production of biotech crops until coexistence rules are in place. The time frame for developing coexistence regulations extends into 2008. In the meantime, however, the UK was the site of the world’s largest ever field study on GMOs.

Field trials and commercial cultivation

Coexistence

Links: Legislation, authorities, research and more
 

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Plants for the Future
March 23, 2007 [nach oben springen]

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