GMO COMPASS - Information on genetically modified organisms
  Aug 1, 2014 | 1:49 pm
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Brazil utilises more GM crops than ever before


(28 January 2011) A study conducted by the specialist agricultural consulting company Celeres indicates that the majority of soybeans and maize in Brazil comes from genetically modified (GM) seeds. The company also notes a national tendency towards increase.

The Celeres company monitored the adoption of biotechnology for the second time. In the crop season of 2010 to 2011, more than three-quarters of the land used in Brazilian soybean agriculture was planted with GM seeds. With an area of 18.1 million hectares, these herbicide-tolerant soybeans already represent 76.2 per cent of the total area. Based on information to date, the monitoring company predicts an increase up to 23.7 million hectares in the next planting.

Maize crops have increased in area by 45.5 per cent since the last season and are estimated to occupy 1.22 million hectares, representing 57.2 per cent of the total area. Three hundred and twenty-five hectares thereof contain GM varieties that are pest-resistant, herbicide-tolerant, or a combination of the two. Known as the ‘stacking’ of GM qualities, such combination is being used for the first time in a regular crop season.

According to Anderson Galvao, Director of Celeres, delays in the releasing of herbicide-tolerant GM traits limited access to the technology in the summer season and can be expected to increase during winter cultivation.

 

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An EU Research Project

What are the risks of growing GM crops?

What are the benefits?

Numerous studies have addressed the potential impacts of genetically modified (GM) plants. Yet the existing evidence on the effects of GM plants is often contradictory and the quality of scientific research varies widely.

Therefore, the GRACE project will establish new tools for assessing the quality of existing studies and will conduct comprehensive reviews to identify health, environmental and socio-economic impacts of GM plants.

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