GMO COMPASS - Information on genetically modified organisms
  Nov 29, 2014 | 12:44 am
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Ingredients and Additives


The greatest likelihood of coming into contact with foods made from GMOs lies with processed ingredients and additives. These GMO-derived substances generally undergo several processing steps and cannot be differentiated from their conventionally produced counterparts. This holds true for processed ingredients or additives made from GM plants and for additives or vitamins produced with the help of genetically modified microorganisms.

Soy: Countless applications for food and feed

Every year, the EU imports approximately 40 million tonnes of raw soy. The world's leading soy producers predominantly grow genetically modified soy cultivars. Soy is not only the basis for numerous ingredients and additives, it also makes up a major part of poultry, swine, and cattle feed.

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Glucose syrup, fructose, dextrose: All made from starch

Converting starch to sugar is one of the most economically important areas of biotechnology. It is a central process in the production of countless foods. Enzymes are responsible for the breakdown of starch, the vast majority of which are produced by genetically modified microorganisms.

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Vitamins, additives, and enzymes - and genetically modified microorganisms

That fact that microorganisms can produce food additives and other useful substances is nothing new. Genetic engineering, however, has opened the door to new possibilites for turning bacteria, yeast, or other fungi into economically viable producers.

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An EU Research Project

What are the risks of growing GM crops?

What are the benefits?

Numerous studies have addressed the potential impacts of genetically modified (GM) plants. Yet the existing evidence on the effects of GM plants is often contradictory and the quality of scientific research varies widely.

Therefore, the GRACE project will establish new tools for assessing the quality of existing studies and will conduct comprehensive reviews to identify health, environmental and socio-economic impacts of GM plants.

More information

 GM Crops: Specific Information and Future Projects
Soybean
Maize
Rapeseed
Cotton
Wheat
Potato
Rice
December 8, 2006 [nach oben springen]

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